+4 votes
286 views
in Fun & Humor ☻ by

9 Answers

+7 votes
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As is so often the case, Shakespeare said it well:

"This above all: to thine own self be true..."  (although Polonius didn't have too much to recommend him)

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+1


@ Tink  So very True
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@ Ser:  Your quote is good, but somehow I don't think Shakespeare wrote it.  :-)
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+1
@ TINK  



Definitely one of his :)
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Well, the reasons I doubt it are as follows.

1. Nearly every published line of Shakespeare was written in iambic pentameter--- this alleged quote is not.

2. Shakespeare would almost certainly have used thee, thou, thine, etc, instead of you and your.

3. I would bet that none of the websites that claim this is from Shakespeare will tell us exactly where it is to be found--- which sonnet, or what act and scene from which play.

4. The only (unlikely) possibility I can think of is that it is a thought of Shakespeare's, but re-written in modern language, without preserving the poetic meter.  It simply doesn't sound like Shakespeare as it stands.  That's why I would like to see exactly where it supposedly comes from, as I said in (3) above.
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Very true

+6 votes
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image


+7 votes
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Keep out of trouble.

+7 votes
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Be who you needed when you were younger.

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@ DF    I like that :D
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+1
Thank you. I came across it recently and it really resonated deeply. I ponder it often. There are more than a few ways to absorb it. It sounds so simple, but if you sit on it, it can be a bit haunting in its complexity. I love things like that. Like a gift that keeps on giving. :)
+3 votes
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Treat everyone else as you want them to treat you, whether in business or personal circumstances. 

+1 vote
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DON'T VOTE LIBERAL

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deserves an LOL
+4 votes
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Always carry a spare.

+2 votes
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o what you love and you'll never perceive that you are working  a day in your life!

"FOLLOW YOUR BLISS"image

Joseph Campbell

0 votes
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Don't block someone, unless you have a very good reason too, even if you are pressured to. It may come back to you one day, negatively.

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