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I was in the library yesterday and suddenly realized, "That is why Rooster was asking about the Pas de Calais...!!!" The 73rd anniversary of D-Day is June 6th, huge Allied casualties (Axis very high also, but still less than the Allies)...but a clear turning point in WWII.

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Lol - I would say the Normandy landings ("Operation Overlord", or, more precisely, "Operation Neptune") on "D-Day".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings


And today is June 6th ...

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Aha, Marianne!

You got it, is correct!

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Lol, Virginia - and I forgot to mention that today is June 6th.


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Yes, yesterday was the anniversary of the D-Day landings. All but Omaha beach suffered light to moderate casualties . The 29th and 1st Infantry divisions lost over 2000 casualties and the Germans between about 2000 to 3000. While at nearby Utah beach? 197 U.S. casualties.

12 hours of intense fighting at Omaha, hence : The Longest Day.

None of the D-Day planned objectives were met either but it gave the Allies the foothold they needed. If Hitler would have released his reserve Panzer divisions? It might have been pushed back into the sea. This is what Rommel and Von Runstedt wanted so badly to do. Destroy the invasion on the beaches.

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@ Rooster,

Yes, I think Rommel said in a fit of pique when he didn't get the Panzer reserves, "If I were the Allied commander, I could now finish this war in three weeks."

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Rooster, and O'Tink, great information. 

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