+3 votes
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in Science & Technology ⚡ by

Einstein treated his first wife, Mileva Marić, very shabbily towards the end of their marriage.

And she may have contributed significantly to his early work.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-forgotten-life-of-einstein-s-first-wife?utm_source=pocket-newtab


4 Answers

+3 votes
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Hell, I didn't even know he had a wife! They don't teach us that stuff in the Marine Corps. :D

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+1

Dummy! :D

+3 votes
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Are you saying that his wife was behind his work? :D :D

Interesting article and I never have heard anything about a wife.

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+1

The article says he and she collaborated on Einstein's early work.

+4 votes
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Einstein lived with her in Novi Sad which was a part of Hungarian half of Austria - Hungary. I heard it in media, not in school. Titel also was in Austria - Hungary.

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Yes, the boundary between Serbia and Hungary was different in those days, relative to today.

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+2 votes
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Hi OtherTink, Yes it is an intriguing article. What I am reminded here for you is a list of (rather nutty) demands Einstein sent to his wife, conditions she must meet for him return to her. They were trying to keep the marriage going for the sake of their children -- and she did agree to these. 

In addition, Einstein carried on extramarital affairs almost from the beginning. As he did also with his cousin who became his second wife. Wife Number Two, I have read, did not mind; she just loved the adoration of being Mrs. Einstein. 

Have you read Einstein is believed to be on the autism spectrum, that like many of humankind's most brilliant and creative members, he was Aspergers? The point being, what many folk might see as incomprehensible is part of a neurodiversity that, even though difficult to live with, nevertheless contributes greatly to humankind. And, there can be great anxiety with Aspergers/autism; one study I read indicates average lifespan is around 36 (I think it was without looking it up). Here is Einstein's list of demands for Mileva:

CONDITIONS

A. You will make sure:

1. that my clothes and laundry are kept in good order;
2. that I will receive my three meals regularly in my room;
3. that my bedroom and study are kept neat, and especially that my desk is left for my use only.

B. You will renounce all personal relations with me insofar as they are not completely necessary for social reasons. Specifically, You will forego:

1. my sitting at home with you;
2. my going out or travelling with you.

C. You will obey the following points in your relations with me:

1. you will not expect any intimacy from me, nor will you reproach me in any way;
2. you will stop talking to me if I request it;
3. you will leave my bedroom or study immediately without protest if I request it.

D. You will undertake not to belittle me in front of our children, either through words or behavior.

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Yes, Virginia, I have read that Einstein may have been autistic; he certainly showed some symptoms of it during childhood, and that list of demands on his wife was more than a little weird, if not outright cruel. :angry:

https://www.appliedbehavioranalysisedu.org/was-albert-einstein-autistic/

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Tink I already left you another comment, and it seems to have disappeared! Maybe it will come back, who knows...anyway, I came back to leave you another observation, because: Look closely at Einstein's eyes in the photo above...he is Sanpaku, ever so slightly but it is there. So I got some information from Wikipedia: "According to Chinese/Japanese medical face reading, when the white part of the eye, known as the sclera, is visible beneath the iris, it represents physical imbalance in the body and is claimed to be present in alcoholics, drug addicts and people who over-consume sugar or grain."

I have also been told that Sanpaku indicates some kind of mental/personality disorder. Not that I subscribe to all that, but still it was interesting to note it in Einstein eyes.

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Yes, Ive noticed some Sanpaku lately. It also applies if there is white showing above the iris.

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It's an interesting article, Tink, brief and informative. I saved it. I also meant to acknowledge -- I did not know the first Mrs. Einstein may have been so much of a contributor. I have read about him a fair amount, coming away with the impression that she had aspirations to physics but no real talent; your information gives another possibility.

I have read a couple of Temple Grandin books; her struggle to find her way in a neurotypical world, also her breath-taking talent. The upshot, when someone is acting really strange I now take more effort to accommodate them, just in case they are basically fine with some sort of alternative brain patterns...such as AS.

Oh and btw this is the lost comment...I found it.

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