+3 votes
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in Education ✍ by

The little known Welsh burial site on the outskirts of Cardiff that’s older than Stonehenge https://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/little-known-welsh-burial-site-18521579


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4 Answers

+4 votes
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"... would die, go mad or become a poet."

I should have known  not to celebrate Beltane there...and they didn't call it Tinkinswood for nothing!   :woot:

+2 votes
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Oh it's just breathtakingly wonderful, SFA --- if I come to London to advocate for Assange, which is remotely possible, I will be sure to come by the Vale of Glamorgan and sleep there on MayDay Eve or other of those special days, see which of the three fates happens to me!

You and I and Tink could all meet up, after all it IS Tinkinswood for goonness sakes.

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+2

Good idea.....:D

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+1

    

Sweet Tink went down to Tinkinswood

To see what she could see.

Arriving there, she said, "Oh, good!

A boulder here, there be,

A-weighing forty tons or more,

A Celtic burial site.

I'm drowsy, and would like a snore;

I'll sleep here overnight."

But Tink did little note it might

Be well-nigh Beltane time,

And ever since that fateful night,

She always spoke in rhyme.    :D

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+2

Oh Tink that is delightful, SO funny, I laughed and laughed...so glad you woke up with the gift of rhyme!

...but I had to look up Beltane, even though I have enough contact with Wiccan to know it is an authentic spiritual tradition, the British Isles, Celtic, Olde Europe...beautiful earth-centered tradition, I even attended a few gatherings of the Lilith Temple in British Columbia! Anyway here is what I found about Beltane:

"Beltane celebrates the union of the Goddess and the Green Man – the coming together of male and female energies to create new life. ... Light a Beltane fire – Traditionally, fires were lit at Beltane. The word itself originates from the Celtic God 'Bel', meaning 'the bright one', and the Gaelic word 'teine', meaning fire."

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+2

Oh yes, Virginia, when the Goddess and the Green Man get together, that always gets the verse flowing!  :)

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+1

Well I just checked to see if there are clootie trees in Wales, sp. maybe cloutie or even clougthie, being Scottish word and yes of course there are! Dip your colorful cloth (the clootie) in the sacred well, then hang it on the tree, with prayer for healing/cleansing...been doing this in Celtic lands for many K's of years, according to grandmother of my Scottish friend in Australia...you can almost see the faerie folk dancing around here!

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...and I just now learned that they did this in Scotland, WWII, a cloutie tree, for prayers when a Highland Division was lost, unable to be evacuated from Dunkirk...tears for the brave Scotsmen.
So we must definitely look for a cloutie well when we all go to the Vale of Glamorgan in Tinkinswood.
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+2

Lovely :D Tink

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+2

Now someone organise this...

+3 votes
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My Ukrainian friend in the other place reminds me it is this today



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+2

Those Ukrainian girls really  know how to celebrate Midsummer. :)

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+1

Sir Furry, I was curious as to how this festival survived...Ivan Kupala...and an article in The Atlantic indicates that Kupala has been combined with a remembrance of St. John the Baptist, thus the Ivan, of course! Like Easter (the pagan goddess Eostre, merged with the Christian remembrance of Resurrection)...

I remember the Lilith Temple in British Columbia, they were a group of 15 or 20, and they got started because one lady began having dreams of the ancient rituals....the persistence of the sacred very strong in the human psyche. I learned the significance of the broom; they began their services with a symbolic broom -- "sweep the walls, sweep the floor, sweep all confusion out the door."  They even ministered in B.C. prisons for a while.

These photos are from that same article in The Atlantic. Anyway, I am glad I found your thread, I did not know of Kupala, nor the Vale of Glamorgan!

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Near Kiev, 2017

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Candle offerings in a river in Turov, Belarus, July 6, 2013. This one reminded me of one year I participated in candle offerings set afloat with prayers on a lake in Seattle, on Hiroshima Day. They probably still do that in Seattle, I hope so.

+2 votes
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Is Vinča older than Stonehenge? It is near me.

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+3

I found an article that says this, Kninjanin... "When the mighty Danube returned to its river bed a century ago, it revealed a great treasure....This archaeological site (Vinča) is a proof that 7,000 years B.C. there was a settlement there. It is considered to have been the center of a civilization that spread across the territory of Bosnia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Montenegro, Macedonia and Greece."

http://www.serbia.com/visit-serbia/cultural-attractions/archaeological-sites/vinca-the-cradle-of-european-civilization/

7,000 BC -- that would be 9,000 years ago???

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+3

That does seem a tad early.

This article says 5700–4500 BC or 5300–4700/4500 BC, which still would be older than Stonehenge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vin%C4%8Da_culture

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+3

Well there is your answer about Vinča, Kninjanin...it's OLD!

the Danube returned to its ancestral bed...now I may have to add Vinča to my bucket list, also, along with the Vale of Glamorgan.

...