+2 votes
36 views

2 Answers

+1 vote
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Heroic Princess Gwenllian ferch Gruffydd, executed at about age 35, about the same age as William Wallace, about 160 years later. :'(

+1 vote
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Oh SirFurry, I appreciated these videos VERY much...her story, her bravery along with the death of her two older sons. And, that her little boy Lord Rhys became so much a part of Welsh history.

I notice that the narrator seems to mispronounce her name? He calls her, sounds like "Gwentlian"...? However, looking at these, YouTube led me to another that I found very moving, it is the story of Llywellyn (sp?) who was killed in 1282, more than a century later. And he is known as the last Prince of Wales by Welsh patriots now, to differentiate his authenticity from the modern title.

And this video does pronounce his name beginning with the 'kitty-hissing" sound that Tink and I learned when you were giving us lessons in the Welsh language! ;) Anyway, if you do watch this, be aware that its creator mentions he is not certain of the history, lost now over the centuries, but has reconstructed what he feels is very likely to have taken place in the pursuit and killing of the last Prince of Wales.

Also, Llywellyn's baby daughter was sent to spend her life in a monastery so she could never have children and thus bring an end to any possibility of continuing his lineage; and indeed she died there at the age of 55. But of interest, after seeing your videos, from the pronunciation of her name, I think the baby daughter's name was Gwenllian! ...and, this video pronounces her name with that kitty-hiss sound...oh, and I forgot me mention also, I think that the modern name Llewellyn means lion, do you know for certain? N'kay here you go, it's fascinating too...

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+1

It is that ‘ll’ sound.....and counts as one letter in the Welsh alphabet.

I’ll crack open a cider.being just in from my trip abroad(England) and listen to it.

Llewelyn I would say was definitely the last genuine Prince of Wales..not like today’s imposters!

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Yes, I recall the kitty-hiss "ll" from our Welsh language lessons...I loved that so much, such delight, :) :D<3...truthfully I love the whole Welsh language now, special thanks to you SFA!

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@SFA, @Virginia:

Wait a minute... here is something strange. According to this video, "LLewellyn" only has the kitty hiss on the first "LL", not the second. Is that correct? Also, in Virginia's video, they spell it with only one "L" instead of two in the last syllable, which seems to me the correct spelling, according to the pronunciation.

But I notice SFA spells it "Llewelyn, which is the correct (I think) spelling for the pronunciation, so maybe my clip pronounces it right, but spells it wrong.  :)

And I thought "Llew" means lion. And google translate gives "ellyn" as razor??? :ermm:

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N'kay SFA, can you get me an' Tink straightened out on the Welsh ll kitty hisses, and the other important concerns here?

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Apparently, one could never really trust noblemen in those days; they were very apt to shift sides to preserve their own skins. Remarkable video, Virginia.

And it is ironic that Welsh longbowmen, fighting for Edward I, may well have been the deciding factor at the battle of Falkirk and Wallace's downfall. :'(

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Oh no...I had to read that twice...the Welsh longbowmen, the deciding factor at the Battle of Falkirk...

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Difficult to get pronunciation over on a forum...and some people never get it right...



I live a district of town called Llanyrafon....meaning the river village but most people say it LAN-yr-Afon not managing that Ll.


 Llewellyn's language of origin is Welsh. Here, the meaning is 'shining one; lion-like; leader; likeness'. Based on the first element of the name, it is sometimes taken to mean 'shining, bright' ultimately from the Indoeuropean leuk, like its short form Llew, or else it could be of the Welsh llyw or eilun (meaning 'likeness, image, idol').


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Oh I thought she does a very nice take on this lovely "LL"...the 'voiceless alveolar lateral fricative"...and present in Cherokee from my own continent, as well as Icelandic, Hmong and Zulu languages!

...and the somewhat uncertain but certainly lovely origin of Llewellyn (Llewelyn) too, ty SirFurry for keeping us straightened out, here :) 

Can you say that a language is itself dear? Somehow I just really feel great affection for Welsh language, along with their indomitable persistence for freedom. <3

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This throws some insight on the origins of the Welsh language


https://www.visitwales.com/info/language/poetry-motion-discover-language-wales


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Going to it for a look now, SFA!

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Here is some, exceptionally good news I gleaned from the first link, SFA...the rate of Welsh speakers double among the children now! :)

Now more than a fifth of the population of modern Cymru can speak or use Welsh. This figure doubles among children,

...