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From BBC History Extra....In 1866, Yorkshire-born industrialist and plumber Thomas Crapper opened the world’s first bathroom showroom in Chelsea. For the first time, people could actually see sanitary products in place. Some were even plumbed in so that potential customers could try before they bought. In the late 1880s, Crapper was asked by the Prince of Wales to install lavatories at Sandringham, and he went on to supply sanitary ware for both Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle.

imageVictorian toilet advert
The world’s first toilet showroom, opened by Thomas Crapper, offered customers a unique buying experience. (Photo by Pictorial Press Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo)

The idea that one of our more robust terms for a bowel movement is derived from his name is a myth – that word was in use well before Crapper became famous. However, it is possible that the American word ‘crapper’, meaning a lavatory, became popular after US soldiers in Britain in 1917 saw his name stamped on the cisterns in some public toilets.

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The idea that one of our more robust terms for a bowel movement is derived from his name is a myth – that word was in use well before Crapper became famous. However, it is possible that the American word ‘crapper’, meaning a lavatory, became popular after US soldiers in Britain in 1917 saw his name stamped on the cisterns in some public toilets.

Some sort of glitch when I posted!

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+1

I was about to ask the question of priority.

But now I have to ask, how did Mr Crapper get a name like that...?  :ermm:

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Yes I ran into the glitch also, cannot post an answer as such...but SFA, I can tell you where I first learned of the 'improved registered ornamental flush down' -- it was in Seattle, maybe 1965, because that is when I went on Seattle's Underground Tour!

There was a Great Seattle Fire on June 6, 1889. That fire burned what is now Pioneer Square, which was most of Seattle then. Then the new construction was required to be of masonry, and so they just covered over the old stuff and "the town’s streets were regraded one to two stories higher." (Information from Wikipedia.)

But you can still go down there and look around, and the old crappers are highlighted showplaces of those bygone days!

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