+2 votes
47 views

2 Answers

+2 votes
by

Grandad was lucky he wasn't discovered by the internees... They don't like spies. :O


by
+1

....:ermm:

+2 votes
by

Well SFA, what I can contribute to this memory is that I worked with a woman who was Nisei (second generation Japanese-American citizen) who was interned in the American concentration camps during WWII. 

I am not certain, but she was probably in Manzanar, in the California desert. I found a video telling about the concentration camp experience, and my friend told me about all the efforts internees made to maintain for each other (especially the children) a civilized life; the schools, newspaper, gardens...all kinds of community projects. My friend had TB, and so she was one of the last to be forced into the camp because of the concern of the administrators for her health -- but ultimately they had no choice but to send her.

She did survive, she lived until 1975 when her frail health finally gave out in her early fifties, I still think of her quite often. Here is the video, I picked it because it is short but seems accurate. I did myself visit Manzanar in 1998...an intense and moving experience still.


by
+2

I couldn't help but notice the euphemism on the sign: "War Relocation Center".

And, irony of ironies, Earl Warren was governor of California at the time.

by
+2

Tink I did not know that; looked up Earl Warren on Wikipedia, truly an interesting person, I did not even realize he was Dewey's running mate in that notorious 1948 presidential election! And I do recall, firsthand, he presided over the 'liberal revolution' of the Supreme Court...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Warren

by
+2
Can’t imagine what it must have been like to be interned in your own country because of your ancestry.
Here of course the Royal family became the Windsors ,although thatvwas around the time of WW1.
by
+2

SFA, if I recall their name was Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, or something like that just too Germanic sounding for a British Royal family...

by
+2

And Mountbatten is an English translation of the original Battenberg. :D

by
+1

I just gasped at that, Tink...but once you already know, it's obvious of course!

by
+2

Virginia, regarding "the 'liberal revolution of the Supreme Court...", Eisenhower is reported to have said that appointing Warren to the Supreme Court was his "biggest mistake." :D

by
+2

Really Tink!!! I am surprised at that...everybody R & D seemed much more "New Deal" then...I did notice on Wikipedia that Warren was a contender in the primary for RNC presidential candidate, which Ike won of course. And I assumed that is why Warren got Ike's nomination to the court...

by
+2

Oh, speaking of German names, Eisenhower (Eisenhauer) literally translates as "iron beater," or maybe iron worker, more loosely.

by
+1

Funny I was just thinking of that...the origin of Eisenhower...too lazy to pursue it, but recalling that "Ike" is usually nickname for Isaac...

by
+2

Here is an article about how Eisenhower and Warren fell out.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/04/commander-v-chief/554045/

by
+1

What a fascinating, in fact delightful article! I would tend to have most confidence in Earl Warren's version of how Ike put it, "the most damn fool thing I ever did." 

Also, I appreciated the commentary on the language...growing up in the decades before PC, I know first-hand how (now-offensive) language can be used with no ill intention whatsoever: "Sadly, if every president forfeits all civil-rights recognition by using racist language in the ugly spirit of his age, then Abraham Lincoln and Lyndon Johnson must go as well."

And I had no idea that the Brown v. decision was unanimous!

...