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Welsh folk music

2 Answers

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Well SFA, I 'appreciated it because it was traditional Welsh, but ima tell you that my tastes in folk music tend to run to the schottische (it's a dance, as well as music), me growin' up among them Swedes and other such Scandinavians and all!

And I was gratified as well as somewhat surprised to learn, folk are still doing the schottische, or at least they were before COVID came on the scene...here are two videos, one old folk and the other some youngsters (with quite tinny audio, sorry there)



Oh, and then there is this one, which is more the way I remember doing it! Plus I like the concept of a Schwedisch Schottische!


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But why do they call it the Schottische?  Is it originally from Scotland?   :unsure:

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Well Tink, I think that is a really important question, penetrating and germane... ;)

I actually did a bit of poking around at the time I posted all that out of the same curiosity, I never questioned it as a child...the Swedes were all doing it then, brought it from the old country, but here is what I found online:

"This dance was known in France, England, Russia, Italy, Greece and various other countries as the “Scottish,” and it would be difficult to explain, if indeed, it could be satisfactorily determined, how the title “Schottische,” which is the German form of the word, ever came to be so definitely applied to the dance as to warrant its adoption, untranslated, into the languages of all the countries referred to."

Then you find this, on the same website;

"The Schottische is a partnered country dance, that apparently originated in Bohemia. It was popular in Victorian era ballrooms as a part of the Bohemian folk-dance craze and left its traces in folk music of countries such as Argentina, Finland, France, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Brazil, Spain, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States, among other nations."

However, a couple of sources on that same website claim the dance originated in Germany...another site I found said No, the Germans just loved it but called it schottische because it came from Scotland!

...and last of all, here is the website I took those quotes from: https://www.wikidancesport.com/wiki/1092/schottische

Oh, isn't SOLVED educational??? :)

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Virginia, here is a dance (in 3/4 time, unlike the Schottische) called La Volta, that was said to have been a great favorite of Queen Elizabeth I.  It is a bit more lively than the Schottische.   :D


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Oh Tink I loved that!<3!<3!

I am assuming you were indicating QE the First? Oh wait, I just noticed you did put the little "I" there, QE I...

Even so, now that I am thinking of the schottische, my heart is yearning, it was so much fun to dance to that when I was so young...ima go and see if I can find on YouTube now the song for the Varsovienne...oh this one I loved VERY much as a child, when all the Scandinavians were first or at most 2nd generation here...

Well, there are various songs called Varsovienne, but this is the tune I remember. However, you REALLY have to use your imagination because this version is not played with nearly as much fullness, passion and hurtfulness as I remember...

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There are Swedes in Jamestown, NY, too!   :)

Probably not as full and passionate as you remember, but "hurtful" (???), never!

PS "varsoviennne" means 'from Warsaw.,' so it's another imported dance. :)

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Oh that spell-check is aggressive...me attempting to describe the quality of "heartfulness" not hurtfulness...oh and nasty spellcheck just tried to do it again but I fixed it; I instructed it to learn the word heartfulness!!!

Hmmm...I wonder if it says something about our society dysfunction, when we have spell-checks that do not recognize heartful but change it to hurtful?

...and varsovienne as indicating 'from Warsaw,' no I did not even know that, quite fascinating really! I liked that version but still not as lovely as the music I remember...do you think the years between 1952 and 2022 might have added luster to my childhood memories? ;)

And Swedes in Jamestown? Did not know that either, seems we kinda seeded the land, here...

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I think my favorite dance is the bergamasca (from Bergamo, Italy). It is so happy, it sometimes brings me to tears of joy. Respighi used it in his Ancient Airs and Dances.



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Oh Tink! I will finish making some turmeric cocoa, and then look forward to listening/watching these, ty!

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Enjoy!   :)

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Yes, truly...the Resphigi was breath-taking, I have not listened to his works much, other than Fountains/Pines of Rome, of course...and then, the natural tendency/ability of folk to celebrate in simple joyful ways...la bergamasca is wonderful!

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And whoever posted Respighi's bergamasca rendition very aptly used a photo of the seven sisters of the Pleiades, as if they were dancing in the heavens!   :)

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O Tink...I watched it too quickly, did not even put that together...the Pleiades, of course! Oh I am laughing and laughing, with delight...yes the composition, incorporating the bergamasca, is heavenly and the YT poster conveyed that so beautifully

+1 vote
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Well, SFA, it's a tale of two dragons, but what is the story in English translation?

Maybe it's about how Arthur Pendragon was born...?   :ermm:  

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The king Ivorus sought to build this castle upon high.
Stone by stone, through sweat and toil, the walls they touch the sky.
The summit bows with morning, but those walls have tumbled down.
The castle’s stones have crumbled and lay scattered on the ground.
 
Sgrech y storm mewn gwewyr [the scream of the storm in awe]
Mellt yn rhwygo’r awyr [lighting strikes the air]
 
There came a boy along the way, a child with magic powers.
And he said: “You’ll build nothing here; you can dig away for hours”.
Beneath this mountain you will find two dragons sleep at night.
Dig down deep, and let them wake, and let those dragons fight.
 
Sgrech y storm mewn gwewyr
Mellt yn rhwygo’r awyr
 
Two dragons crawled out of the deep, and one was red as blood.
The other, white, was breathing fire and flew up high above.
Teeth, blood, fire, and bone, they battled, and they bled.
And the white dragon growing weak had fled.
 
Sgrech y storm mewn gwewyr
Mellt yn rhwygo’r awyr
Sgrech y storm mewn gwewyr
Mellt yn rhwygo’r awyr

https://lyricstranslate.com

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Thank you, SFA. :)

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Yes I agree with Tink, ty SFA

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